on the eve of Father’s Day in the US, here’s a tip from the dad of an autistic child across the pond in England:

beach

When you have a child on the spectrum, you get used to disapproving looks from strangers. But if people learned to be kinder and more understanding, it would benefit everyone.

ne of the most difficult things about autism is the judgment of other people. That has been my experience of having a son on the spectrum. Throughout his life, from trips to the park as a toddler to restaurant visits now as an 11-year-old, it has been the reactions of strangers that have really hurt. Sometimes Zac finds social situations very difficult. If things are noisy, if there is something he wants that he can’t have, he finds it tough to process those emotions. He may cry, he may become angry, he may have what is commonly termed “a complete meltdown”. As parents, my wife and I have developed ways to foresee and manage these situations, but if we are in a public place, or if my son is with other adults, everything becomes far more fraught and complicated. You get used to the disapproving looks. You get used to being judged.

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/jun/16/how-to-help-people-with-autism-just-be-nice